Busses – SBS Depot http://sbs-depot.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sbs-depot.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Busses – SBS Depot http://sbs-depot.com/ 32 32 SunLive – Free bus fares capped after violence at bus stops https://sbs-depot.com/sunlive-free-bus-fares-capped-after-violence-at-bus-stops/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/sunlive-free-bus-fares-capped-after-violence-at-bus-stops/ A wave of violence at bus stops in Tauranga, mainly instigated by young people, prompted the regional council to restrict free buses for under-18s. During deliberations on the annual plan on Wednesday, Bay of Plenty Regional Councilors voted to restrict free rates from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. for […]]]>

A wave of violence at bus stops in Tauranga, mainly instigated by young people, prompted the regional council to restrict free buses for under-18s.

During deliberations on the annual plan on Wednesday, Bay of Plenty Regional Councilors voted to restrict free rates from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. for young people in Western Bay of Plenty, from 4 June.

Criminal and anti-social behavior at bus stops has been a problem for years and in 2020 security guards were put in place at the Willow Street interchange in the Tauranga CBD, Greerton and Farm Street in Mount Maunganui.

The most recent issue came on Saturday, when a man was attacked by a group of youths near the Farm Street bus stop. This is just one of many examples of antisocial behavior at city bus stops.

In May a young man was arrested for possessing a homemade taser at the Willow Street bus stop, there were assaults and aggressive and threatening behavior often targeting bus drivers.

Bus drivers have also threatened to boycott the Willow Street bus interchange after death threats and abuse.

These issues have prompted the police, NZ Bus, the company that operates the buses, and regional council staff to recommend limiting free fares for young people aged 18 and under to peak school hours.

A trial of free fares for all school-aged children traveling at all times has been in place since May 2021.

Clifford Paxton, Area Commander Western Bay of Plenty. Image File/SunLive.

Speaking in favor of the reduction, Western Bay of Plenty Area Commander Inspector Clifford Paxton said that since the free trial there has been an increase in problems.

“Since we have seen free buses become widespread, we have seen an escalation in anti-social behavior, especially among our young people.

“At the end of the day, these young people have the free field of the city.

“Their behavior has an impact on those who legitimately go about their business and the free buses allow all behavior to continue.

“Most of these young people don’t have the money or the resources to move freely around the city.

“By preventing this movement, they will not have the ability to congregate, intimidate and offend those who are legitimately trying to go about their business.

“We need to prevent their ability to move around the city at will.”

NZ Bus chief operating officer Jay Zmijewski said in his 22 years in the bus industry he had never seen the level of anti-social and criminal behavior Tauranga had experienced before.

He says abuse of drivers not only takes a toll on them, but also on the community, as bus services can be affected by a lack of driver availability.

“Drivers are often too shaken or injured to continue, often lasting more than a day.”

Zmijewski also spoke of the constant vandalism on buses the company deals with.

“These young people cut our seats, burned our seats, burned flooring, melted window laminate and graffitied virtually every part of the bus.

“We have to repair vandalism in our buses daily.

“The crux of the problem is that the security guards no longer seem sufficient.”

He says there needs to be a two-step approach that addresses broader social issues and a short-term solution.

“We really need in the short term to restore the confidence of drivers, so that they can stop and pick up people who are doing the right thing, just trying to get from A to B.”

Zmijewski suggests initiatives where the police get on the buses or stop the buses and weed out any “troublemakers”.

He says the reduction in free rates is “an effective short-term solution to at least slow down the number of incidents.”

From June 4, free bus rides for school-aged children will only be available during peak hours. Photo: John Borren/SunLive.

Former security guard Chimmyma Kiora Williams describes the day-to-day reality of working at the Willow Street bus interchange

“Security in CBD is not normal security work, it is actually a type of social work.”

Williams says this is because they deal with older people, people living on the streets, rangatahi (young people) aged 10-18 and the general public.

She says the security guards work with the police who are “very good” but they cannot always attend to incidents or attend to them quickly due to staffing issues or other incidents throughout the city.

“At the end of the day, if the police couldn’t come and there was unrest, you were the security, you had to try to defuse, manage and help those who felt there was harm, to feel in security.

“It’s going on a lot mentally, it’s going on a lot physically and it’s a lot of different social groups.”

Williams says the security guards who work at the bus stop need authority to be able to move people and have the support of schools.

“A lot of these kids who are down the bus plaza show up in uniform.

“They don’t go to school, they don’t care about the law because in their minds they have less [being criminally convicted].

“We have to find a way to support them and encourage them to feel part of the community. [and] take responsibility for their actions. »

Williams says the youths often mingled with homeless people hanging out at the Willow Street bus interchange.

She says homeless people drink, take drugs, sniff glue and sometimes buy alcohol for young people.

“Young people will be attracted there and they will start to mingle with our adults there who may not be the best influence.

“Because these adults notice them, whether it’s good or not, and these young people feel like they’re part of something.”

Williams says there’s a group of about 15 youngsters who are causing a lot of trouble.

It supports the reduction of the free trial rate.

“I really believe that removing these [free] rates will make a positive difference.

Williams suggests making sure security guards posted at bus stops had the “right skills” to deal with problems, as well as giving them protective vests and body cameras for their safety.

The cost of security at bus stops is currently $600,000 per year, with the cost shared between Bay of Plenty Regional Council and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.

At the meeting, the board approved an additional budget for increased security, which is expected to cost around $200,000 per year.

Public interest journalism funded by NZ On Air.

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Eternal Rock’n’Rollers Enuff Z’Nuff Invade Draper • Salt Lake Magazine https://sbs-depot.com/eternal-rocknrollers-enuff-znuff-invade-draper-salt-lake-magazine/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:32:43 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/eternal-rocknrollers-enuff-znuff-invade-draper-salt-lake-magazine/ Chip Z’Nuff (also known to childhood and internet friends as Gregory Rybarski) is the ultimate rock ‘n’ roll survivor. His band, Enuff Z’Nuff, has been active for over 40 years, releasing over two dozen albums and playing venues of various sizes across the country during that time. For some shows, he’ll even turn the band […]]]>

Chip Z’Nuff (also known to childhood and internet friends as Gregory Rybarski) is the ultimate rock ‘n’ roll survivor. His band, Enuff Z’Nuff, has been active for over 40 years, releasing over two dozen albums and playing venues of various sizes across the country during that time. For some shows, he’ll even turn the band into a tribute band, The Beatles Rock Show, and the influence of the Fab Four can be heard directly when Enuff Z’Nuff takes the stage today, with songs like “Magical Mystery Tour and “Eleanor Rigby” dotting the playlist, along with Paul McCartney’s “Jet.”

These are all songs Enuff Z’Nuff played in the first 45 minutes of their Friday night show at Leatherheads (12147 South State St., Draper) last weekend, a gig that saw the band form a fanbase of several dozen diehards who were on hand to catch an act that never lost faith, despite countless changes in the look, feel and sound of American rock ‘n’ roll since the release of their self-titled debut album in 1989.

By then, the Chicagoland band was riding high, scoring two hits from that album in 1990 via “Fly High, Michelle” and “New Thing.” Both videos were MTV staples and featured a brilliant look and sound that incorporated a mix of everything that had come before them over the past two decades. There was the tousled hair of bands like Poison, the punk and power-pop sounds of Redd Kross, the glamorous hard rock of Dramarama.

Of course, 1991 was “the year punk broke out” and Nirvana and their kin would take over the rock charts in the short term. While a host of their contemporaries lost their careers by this time, Chip Z’Nuff maintained his band, losing his co-founders along the way, as he cemented himself in a role as songwriter, lead singer, bassist and emcee. His work is part of what makes an Enuff Z’Nuff a unique experience.

At Leatherheads, Z’Nuff bathed in the glow of his fans’ love, reminding them, again and again, of his band’s long history, checking the names of everyone from Tupac to David Letterman. Many songs come with a short intro, with Z’Nuff referencing past shows in Utah and discolored hijinks in hotel rooms and tour buses within the state limits. Z’Nuff works blue and no one is shocked by what might come out of the veteran artist’s mouth, a throwback style that’s a bit carny circus and a bit Borscht-belt comedic, in addition to his obvious role as rock ‘n’ roll bandleader.

Today, Chip Z’Nuff’s band consists of Tory Stoffregen on lead guitar, Tony Fennell on bass; and Daniel Hill on drums. Together for about seven years in this unit, it’s not uncommon for a member to drop out for another gig, only to come back home later. In fact, one of Z’Nuff’s riffs was a preview of who played in what other projects and when – a jam-packed little information blast in the middle of the show.

The band played for well over an hour before Z’Nuff spoke the magic words, pointing to “Fly High, Michelle” and “New Thing” and for a good 10 minutes the superfans were ecstatic. These were the money makers, the tracks that suggest you shell out $20 to see Enuff Z’Nuff on a random Friday night in 2022. Humorously, at the end of the tracks, Z’Nuff pretty much said that the audience didn’t have to beg for an encore as Z’Nuff and Fennell swapped instruments and the rock rolled into a 12-15 minute jam that looped through Edgar Winter, Stone Temple Pilots, Foghat and even another pinch of “New Thing”. It was an odd match, but the band had completed a 90-minute set almost to the minute.

As the group strolled through the Green Room curtain minutes later, they were rushed by the small audience onto the dance floor, everyone huddled for autographs, selfies and handshakes. hand. Out of nowhere, the AP announced that the karaoke was moving inside the patio, at the request of the police.

Just another night on the road to Enuff Z’Nuff.


Check out all of our A&E coverage here, and while you hang around, subscribe already and enjoy the best of Utah living.

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Jefferson County schools prepare for Tuesday’s budget votes | Education https://sbs-depot.com/jefferson-county-schools-prepare-for-tuesdays-budget-votes-education/ Sun, 15 May 2022 00:20:52 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/jefferson-county-schools-prepare-for-tuesdays-budget-votes-education/ WATERTOWN — It’s that time of year — school district voters will be asked to approve the 2022-23 budgets and various related proposals. Voting will take place on Tuesday in each of the school districts in Jefferson County. Registered voters must be US citizens, at least 18 years old, and have resided in the school […]]]>

WATERTOWN — It’s that time of year — school district voters will be asked to approve the 2022-23 budgets and various related proposals.

Voting will take place on Tuesday in each of the school districts in Jefferson County. Registered voters must be US citizens, at least 18 years old, and have resided in the school district in which they are voting for at least 30 days prior to voting.

The Indian River Central School District, one of the largest districts in the county, is asking voters to approve a budget of $92,039,519, a 2.12% increase from this year’s adjusted budget. The tax levy is $2,615,900, an increase of just under 1.25% over last year, which is below the tax cap of 2.3%. Tax bills are expected to rise only slightly as assessments in the district have risen, so the levy is now spread across a wider population.

According to Indian River Chief Commercial Officer Audrey Stevenson, the district entered this year with a strong fund balance, $46 million.

“What we will do over the next few months is we will finalize what we will end the year with as a fund balance,” she said. “We expect this to grow a bit, but one of the ways we will use some of our unused credits will be to create two new reserve funds. We already have two financial reserves for capital projects, and we are asking voters to create another capital reserve so that we start saving for what is planned, the needs for electric buses and the infrastructure that goes with it.

In addition, the school board has created a $2 million repair reserve for major items that do not have an annual or shorter maintenance cycle. The proposed budget takes into account increases in fuel and utility costs, Ms. Stevenson said, with the district unsure whether the trend of recent months will continue into next year.

The vote on the Indian River budget will take place in the high school‘s large group teaching room from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

“Even in meeting the urgent needs resulting from the pandemic, many long-planned and much-needed improvements to our facilities have been completed or are underway at a level and pace never before seen in Indian River,” the superintendent said. Troy W. Decker. “These include, but are certainly not limited to high-efficiency geothermal systems, new flooring and roofing, physical facility upgrades, improved security and communication systems, and more.”

The Watertown City School District also increased its budget for the 2022-2023 school year, by just over $4.5 million, with a tax levy increase of 0.69%. The previous budget provided for an increase in tax levies of 1.8%.

“Our tax levy only increases by 0.69% because with the increase in aid to foundations, we have been able to balance the budget without having to vote by supermajority on the increase in taxes,” said the WCSD Business Manager, Joshua W. Hartshorne. “We could have gone up to 2% and kind of kept it pretty stable over the last few years, but given the increase in foundation aid, we were able to keep that low.”

In April, the school board adopted an expenditure budget of $82,983,069 for the 2022-2023 school year. Budget highlights include the continuation and expansion of current programs and staff to help students meet or exceed New York City graduation requirements; the addition of two psychologists, an additional home school coordinator, an RTI/Math teacher, an English teacher, a librarian, and a school counselor; and continued investments in physical and IT infrastructure, including a capital project at Knickerbocker Elementary to remove risers and replace flooring in the library, as well as replace playground equipment.

“I think for me, one of the things I’m proud of is that we’re going to be able to continue and grow some of our current programs and staff to help students meet or exceed the graduation requirements of New York State,” said Superintendent Patricia B. LaBarr. “These things that we do are all really student-centered and that’s exciting.”

If the proposed budget is rejected, the school board will have to reduce the overall tax levy by $116,841. This reduction would impact many non-mandated areas, such as having additional elementary school aides and an additional school resource officer. The cut would also mean foregoing technology and infrastructure upgrades. If a contingent budget is actually passed due to a budget defeat, it is mandated to have a 0% or less tax increase in the year 2021-22. The board has yet to determine what items would be included in an eventual budget.

The district budget vote will take place from noon to 9 p.m. Tuesday. Voters residing in the North Electoral District — defined the part of the city north of the Black River and the towns of LeRay and Pamelia within the district boundaries — will vote at the North Elementary School Gymnasium. Voters residing in the Southern Electoral District – defined as the part of the city south of the Black River and the towns of Rutland and Watertown – will vote in the choir hall at Watertown High School.

Other School Districts in Jefferson County:

Alexandria: Residents will vote on a proposed budget of $15,030,670, a change of 5.62% from last year. The district has proposed a tax levy increase of 3.9%. Voters will also consider an additional proposal to bond student transportation vehicles as part of the district’s routine fleet replacement. If the proposal is approved, the district will borrow up to $315,000 to purchase two 66-passenger buses and a school vehicle.

Belleville: The proposed budget increases by 2.59% to $11,668,784 and the royalty will increase by 3%. The proposed budget includes a $100,000 capital expenditure project for school building security upgrades; $12,000 for teachers’ supplies to ease the burden on families; and two new school buses.

Carthage: Proposed budget of $67,082,204 reflects a 0% increase in tax levies. The proposed budget uses $6.6 million of unrestricted fund balance to allow the district to keep the tax levy flat for the fifth straight year. There will also be a proposal for financial support for the local public librarian.

General Brown: The proposed total budget for the district is $25,994,591, an increase of $244,286. The tax levy is $8,844,096, an increase of 2.85%.

LaFargeville: The proposed budget includes a 1.17% increase in spending over last year, for a total budget of $12,038,948. There is an increase in the tax levy of 2.92%, which corresponds to the tax ceiling.

Lyme: The proposed budget uses $588,000 of unrestricted fund balance, or savings, to allow the district to ease the burden on taxpayers with a 1.11% tax increase for district residents. The proposed budget is $8,972,391. Voters will also be asked to approve $86,141 for the Lyme Free Library.

Sackets Harbour: Residents will vote on a proposed spending plan of $9,674,424, an increase of $236,189 from last year. The increase is mainly due to contractual agreements. If approved, the budget would increase the tax levy by 1.10%.

Voters will also decide on a proposal to purchase a 66-passenger school bus costing no more than $130,886.

South Jefferson: The proposed budget is $39,083,979, an increase of 4.95% over last year. The proposed tax levy is 2%, below the 2.02% tax cap based on the state tax cap formula.

There will also be two proposals for voters – authorization to purchase six replacement student transport vehicles, including necessary furniture, fixtures and equipment and all other costs for a total amount not to exceed 659 $000; and the creation of a $5 million capital reserve fund.

Thousand Islands: The proposed budget for the upcoming school year remains unchanged from last year’s budget of $22,922,490. There is a 0% tax levy change.

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PC in the cloud? What challenges are streaming services facing? https://sbs-depot.com/pc-in-the-cloud-what-challenges-are-streaming-services-facing/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:54:51 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/pc-in-the-cloud-what-challenges-are-streaming-services-facing/ The demand for cloud streaming of games and powerful processors is becoming increasingly popular, but many technical challenges persist. Why isn’t the concept of cloud computing new, what challenges will new streaming services face, and will remote computing ever take over? Why is the concept of Cloud Computing not new? Although the concept of cloud […]]]>

The demand for cloud streaming of games and powerful processors is becoming increasingly popular, but many technical challenges persist. Why isn’t the concept of cloud computing new, what challenges will new streaming services face, and will remote computing ever take over?

Why is the concept of Cloud Computing not new?

Although the concept of cloud computing may seem new, its origins actually date back to some of the first consumer computers of the 1960s and 1970s. Before we can understand how remote computing became commonplace during this time, we need to d first understand why computers were big and expensive.

For a computer to be practical, it must be able to perform calculations on real-world data that can be used in real-world applications. For example, early military computers were used to calculate ordnance tables that would allow ships to accurately hit targets, while some early IBM machines were used to count tabulated data for the national census in the States -United.

Regardless of the technology used, computers are generally practical in the real world when they have data buses of at least 16 bits, memories of several hundred MB, and instruction speeds of several million per second. Now, that doesn’t mean that 8-bit machines can’t be used in practice, because 8-bit machines have dominated the personal computer market for some time, but while they can be useful for home applications, they certainly cannot be used for large-scale computing applications such as scientific research and transaction processing.

So even early computers had to scale quickly to be practical. For example, the IBM System 360, which was released in 1964, had 32-bit words, 24-bit address space, and could run up to 16.6 MIPS. Such computers would be built from discrete components, which would see their size increase rapidly. Thus, it makes economic sense to build a large computer with decent capabilities that can be used for many purposes instead of a smaller system with reduced capabilities (because those reduced capabilities would be insufficient for demanding tasks).

However, the development of very large mainframe machines also made sense when engineers developed the concept of remote computing and time-sharing. It is significantly cheaper to have a large mainframe capable of handling 100 users all using terminals (screen, keyboard and a basic interface) than trying to give all 100 users their own dedicated machines.

This use of remote computing continued for several decades, during which companies purchased large mainframe computers to which employees logged on using small desktop terminals. As computing power improved, these terminals were gradually replaced by desktop computers capable of providing some degree of local processing, while the central computer provided users with additional processing power if necessary. Some mainframes even allowed remote access over telephone networks with the use of a modem, leading some companies to rent out their unused processing power to others under time-sharing schemes.

What challenges will the new streaming services face?

Many companies have recently attempted to bring computing back into mainframes and data centers. For example, Amazon Web Services provides online cloud computing services that are easily scalable with applications such that an application requiring more resources can be dynamically assigned to them.

Another example would be Microsoft Azure which essentially provides the same services as Amazon Web Services. Google also provides cloud-based software solutions such as Google Docs and Google Sheets, which are free browser versions of Word and Excel.

The benefits of cloud computing are numerous, from being accessible from anywhere, the ability to remove the need for powerful computers, the ability to work across multiple platforms, and the security offered by data centers ( unexpected power loss will not see the data loss on the user side). Additionally, cloud computing places the responsibility for system maintenance on the data center, and the large number of users pooling their resources provides access to hardware that would otherwise be too expensive to own (server-grade processors , high-end GPUs, etc.).

In fact, Nvidia and Microsoft are exploring the idea of ​​streaming computing resources. For example, Nvidia offers a game streaming service called GeForce Now that allows subscribers to remotely play games on servers hosted by Nvidia. Microsoft is also reportedly developing its own Xbox Anywhere service, which saves customers the hassle of buying consoles and remotely accessing Xbox games on Microsoft servers.

However, remote computing services such as those developed by Microsoft and offered by Nvidia face many challenges. By far the biggest challenge is the quality of the connection between the user and the server.

For non-intensive applications such as word processing, the quality of an Internet connection is rarely an issue because the amount of data exchanged between client and server is minimal. However, an intensive application such as a game requires not only high quality video streaming but also low latency input response.

Whereas the typical gamer can expect to see pings between 20ms and 40ms on a good day when running gaming software locally, relying on a remote server to stream video and keystrokes on the keyboard could considerably aggravate the situation. Additionally, the increased distance between a player and the streaming server will compound this effect, and thus either latency suffers or video quality.

So, only those who have excellent connections between themselves and the server will be able to enjoy these streaming services. Even then, such a service can only handle a limited number of users at a time, and it is highly likely that users in one geographic location will be playing at the same time (i.e. after the work, afternoon, etc.). This could cause performance degradation during peak hours, further reducing video quality or increasing input latency.

Will remote computing ever take over?

Although great progress has been made in the field of remote computing, remote computing is unlikely to become the norm for intensive applications. Everyday applications such as word processing will greatly benefit from cloud computing as documents can be accessed anywhere and anytime, but those who enjoy gaming will often invest energy and time in their gaming device. , trying to support all existing games will be difficult for servers to manage, which could limit remote gaming to a few popular titles while other smaller games continue to be played on mainstream PCs.

Subscription services, however, could make remote computing more popular as companies try to find alternative methods of generating revenue. By keeping all hardware and software on remote platforms, those seeking to access them must pay monthly fees, which can provide businesses with a healthy source of revenue. Of course, subscription models are universally hated as they are seen as a way to prevent outright ownership of hardware and software, and abuse of such a revenue model could see customers actively refuse to support IT solutions remotely.

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Zimbabwe: Transport blues – Government says it has the commuting public at heart https://sbs-depot.com/zimbabwe-transport-blues-government-says-it-has-the-commuting-public-at-heart/ Wed, 11 May 2022 09:45:05 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/zimbabwe-transport-blues-government-says-it-has-the-commuting-public-at-heart/ The government says it is developing relevant regulations to liberalize the public transport sector. Speaking to reporters at a post-ministerial press conference in Harare on Tuesday, Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa said the government had the interests of the traveling public at heart, hence the decision to introduce new public transport systems. “These will include licensing […]]]>

The government says it is developing relevant regulations to liberalize the public transport sector.

Speaking to reporters at a post-ministerial press conference in Harare on Tuesday, Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa said the government had the interests of the traveling public at heart, hence the decision to introduce new public transport systems.

“These will include licensing of operators on any given route. The regulations will go a long way in mitigating the plight of urban commuters,” Mutsvangwa said.

She added: ‘The Government takes this opportunity to assure citizens that it has the interests of the traveling public at heart and will extend all its efforts to ensure the situation is rapidly improved.’

The transport crisis in urban areas has worsened in the past two weeks after police launched a crackdown on unauthorized vehicles commonly known as mushikashika

Commuters in urban areas found themselves stranded, spending hours in queues waiting for transport while others risked their lives and traveled on the roofs of buses.

Some were forced to walk long distances to and from work as ZUPCO buses could not keep up with demand.

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An inside look at the ‘new’ Point Loma High School https://sbs-depot.com/an-inside-look-at-the-new-point-loma-high-school/ Mon, 09 May 2022 18:29:36 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/an-inside-look-at-the-new-point-loma-high-school/ By Ted Walker / Peninsula News from the Point Loma Association Many of us walk past Point Loma High School and wonder what it looks like inside, and when will the project be finished? Clark Burlingame and I recently visited campus with Principal Kelly Lowry to ask these questions. There was so much to see […]]]>

By Ted Walker / Peninsula News from the Point Loma Association

Many of us walk past Point Loma High School and wonder what it looks like inside, and when will the project be finished?

Clark Burlingame and I recently visited campus with Principal Kelly Lowry to ask these questions. There was so much to see that we will share our observations on 3 editions of this newsletter.

The construction project is divided into 2 phases, the first being the current activity, which is approximately 95% complete according to Lowry.

Most educational spaces are ready to be occupied or close to it.

The rooms are bright with lots of windows.

Upper level classrooms have stunning views!

The school district holds a public ribbon cutting in early June. Watch the PLA newsletters for more details. Phase 2 is expected to start in 2027.

Even with construction underway, we were impressed with the positive “vibe” of around 1,700 students starting school at 8:45am.

(Remember when we had to be there before the sun came up and we had to walk up the hill, back and forth, in the snow?)

Thinking back to Pete Seeger’s 1955 hit, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” we asked, “Where did all the buses go?”

The entire district has reduced the number of buses serving each school, and PLHS is now down to just 4 or 5, according to Lowry.

PL residents passing the school around start and exit time likely noticed the improved traffic flow.

In the next edition, we’ll take you deeper inside campus to reveal the exciting changes to educational and support spaces.

Living in Point Loma for over 40 years, Ted Walker is a former Director and Officer (Treasurer) of the Point Loma Association.

OB Rag Editordude: Pretty cool inside my old alma matar. And thank you to the people who started the Point Loma Assoc. online newsletter. We also reposted a previous newsletter article about “something funny” in front of PLHS, but instead of praising the staff as “spiritual and irreverent” – I made a typo and said “irrelevant” at the square. Sorry y’all. (Our original repost has been corrected.)

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Everything you need to know about the Deacon Blue concert in Aberdeen https://sbs-depot.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-deacon-blue-concert-in-aberdeen/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-deacon-blue-concert-in-aberdeen/ Everything you need to know about the Deacon Blue concert in Aberdeen Schedule An icon of a desktop calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across it. Caret A right-pointing solid arrow icon. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of Facebook’s “f” mark. Google An icon of […]]]>




Everything you need to know about the Deacon Blue concert in Aberdeen



































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2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon returns to the streets of Steel City – Pittsburgh: In Focus https://sbs-depot.com/2022-dicks-sporting-goods-pittsburgh-marathon-returns-to-the-streets-of-steel-city-pittsburgh-in-focus/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:51:34 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/2022-dicks-sporting-goods-pittsburgh-marathon-returns-to-the-streets-of-steel-city-pittsburgh-in-focus/ Runners and eager spectators lined the streets of Pittsburgh on Sunday morning as the Pittsburgh Marathon returned after a COVID-19 hiatus. A wet forecast greeted the runners, with rain falling in patches throughout the morning and the threat of storms threatening the region throughout the day. See more Post-Gazette coverage here. Runners cheer at the […]]]>

Runners and eager spectators lined the streets of Pittsburgh on Sunday morning as the Pittsburgh Marathon returned after a COVID-19 hiatus.

A wet forecast greeted the runners, with rain falling in patches throughout the morning and the threat of storms threatening the region throughout the day. See more Post-Gazette coverage here.

Runners cheer at the start line of the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon on Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
A photographer works from a cherry picker as participants run beneath him at the start of the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, along Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
The first run of the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon takes off from the start line, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)

A runner dressed as a bear starts the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. in downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Spectators cheer on participants in the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon near the start line of the course, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Participants begin the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Hand cyclists begin the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon on Sunday, May 1, 2022 on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
A power outage cut out race music and deflated the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon start line banner as participants watch in the background, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The event was back shortly after a few minutes. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Participants in the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon take off from the start line, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Participants wearing backpacks begin the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. in downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Participants begin the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Rain pours as people walk near shuttles for the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, on Liberty Ave. downtown. The marathon started with rain and light. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
Runners pass along Frankstown Avenue during the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, Sunday, May 1, 2022, in Larimer. The marathon is back in person after being held virtually for two years during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)
New Kensington’s PJ Colligan and his death metal band called Leprosy play as runners pass along Frankstown Ave. during the 2022 Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon on Sunday, May 1, 2022, at Larimer. The band members moved across the street after their original performance venue was flooded in the morning weather and a clogged drain. (Stephanie Strasbourg/Post-Gazette)

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US border battle, migrant bus to DC and teacher shortage https://sbs-depot.com/us-border-battle-migrant-bus-to-dc-and-teacher-shortage/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 22:51:23 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/us-border-battle-migrant-bus-to-dc-and-teacher-shortage/ This Week in Texas Politics: US Border Battle, D.C. Migrant Buses, and Teacher Shortages FOX 7 Austin’s Rudy Koski and a panel of political analysts discuss big political topics and more on “This Week in Texas Politics.” TEXAS – There are big topics unfolding in Texas this week: the border battle, migrant buses to DC […]]]>

There are big topics unfolding in Texas this week: the border battle, migrant buses to DC that have plenty of empty seats, and the growing trend of teacher shortages in local schools.

FOX 7 Austin’s Rudy Koski and a panel of political analysts discuss these issues in more detail in “This Week in Texas Politics.”

KOSK: Here we are back in the LBJ Penthouse to talk about This Week in Texas Politics. And the hot topic in Texas politics right now is still the border crisis. But there are also other issues like Democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke making the news by being covered up and then making his own. The former head of Planned Parenthood, a high profile campaign manager. There have been several state legislative hearings on issues such as temporary paper abuse, vehicle tags, a growing shortage of teachers and the increase in electric cars on the road. How will the state replace lost gasoline tax revenue? We will talk about it. But first, let’s start with our headlines, and we’ll start with Steven Tyler in Box Four Dallas. What is your title?

DIAL: Borders and buses.

KOSK: Greg Groogan with Fox 26 Houston. What is your title?

GROOGAN: Title 42. Is the word invasion a hyperbole?

KOSK: Patrick Svitek with Texas Tribune. Patrick, what is your title?

SVITE K: I agree with everyone so far. The 42 Fallout title continues.

KOSK: And political consultant Mark Wiggins, what’s your title?

WIGGINS: Nothing replaces Texas teachers.

KOSK: And let’s get off the board right now and talk about the border, Patrick. Title 42, is there a valid replacement at this time or does it remain?

SVITE K: Right now the Biden administration, it looks like they’re going ahead with their plan to reverse that policy at the end of May, but they’re trying to reassure people, including some in their party, that they have a plan to cope with the expectation of an even greater influx of migrants once this policy ends.

DIAL: Building on what Patrick said, the Biden administration needs to come up with a plan, and it needs to come up with a plan that actually has bipartisan support.

GROOGAN: I was just thinking about the repercussions. We’re talking about all of the South Texas infrastructure and major cities being overrun. We are talking about public schools with thousands more students. We talk about the health care safety net. I think it turns out that what could be a single-digit run in November turns into a double-digit four-for-four loss for Beto.

WIGGINS: So you’ve already seen Beto thread the needle on this and say the administration needs to have a plan if they want to scrap Title 42.

KOSK: Patrick, some hearings that took place about the National Guard. There are two big issues that caught my attention, first, the lack of state deployment death benefits on this current deployment and all other state deployments, and then also the lack of flotation devices.

SVITE K: Revelations like these continue to fuel this narrative. I think this mission was put together in a hurry, not carefully thought out.

KOSK: Mark, I know you’re watching the education topics that came up in the committee hearings and a discussion you and I had. The teacher shortage that is already there and getting worse. What is your concern? Is this the dormant problem of the session? It’s coming.

WIGGINS: The shortage of teachers will be the number one problem in public education next term. And, you know, it comes at a very risky time when you’re talking about public education, the way public education is being discussed right now.

KOSK: So even another hearing took place that you monitored. I know it was about temporary vehicle tags as well as electric cars and their impact on gas tax. Greg, I know this is a problem in the Houston area as well. What is their importance in the next session?

GROOGAN: I don’t know how we can map the genome, but we don’t know how to do better with these paper plates. It’s crazy.

DIAL: Now they’re also considering adding things like QR codes, different colors, and a corporate sticker that can go in the car when you have a temporary tag. And so, I mean, that’s a huge problem. He has been associated with dozens, if not hundreds of violent crimes.

KOSK: Another transportation problem but related to the border, Governor Greg Abbott’s migrant buses bound for Washington, DC. Few people take these buses, as few as ten go there. And now the White House is kidding. Patrick, is it time to put the brakes on this program?

SVITE K: I don’t know if it’s time to end it, but I think, you know, whatever the initial momentum was behind this plan, I think it’s backed off a bit.

WIGGINS: And now you have Democrats accusing the Governor of encouraging illegal immigration by offering these rides, which is really an expert level troll.

GROOGAN: People don’t get off those free Texas buses. They stay here. However, there are 233,000 apprehensions or encounters in the month of March. That’s twice the population of Beaumont, Texas in a month.

DIAL: I really think he continues. I think he will continue to move money around to make sure, on his terms, that the border is his number one priority.

KOSK: Very well. Let’s end this week with our only word of the week. Mark, we’ll start with you. Your word of the week.

WIGGINS: That’s the interim.

KOSK: Patrick, your word.

SVITE K: Bus.

KOSK: Steven, your word.

DIAL: He took my Word. Frontier.

KOSK: And Greg, your word of the week.

GROOGAN: I’ll expand on that, Border-less.

KOSK: And with that, we wrap up another week in Texas politics.

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SRCO signs ZAGMotoX for its iMobile app, has wellness product divisions and has a very low stock float: Sparta Commercial Services, Inc. (ticker symbol: SRCO) https://sbs-depot.com/srco-signs-zagmotox-for-its-imobile-app-has-wellness-product-divisions-and-has-a-very-low-stock-float-sparta-commercial-services-inc-ticker-symbol-srco/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 14:28:07 +0000 https://sbs-depot.com/srco-signs-zagmotox-for-its-imobile-app-has-wellness-product-divisions-and-has-a-very-low-stock-float-sparta-commercial-services-inc-ticker-symbol-srco/ Several subsidiaries in the finance, mobile applications and well-being sectors. The Leon County, Florida Sheriff’s Department joins the Municipal Lease Program. Cryptocurrency payment platform launched with a range of options. The City of Yemassee, SC is renewing its business with the Municipal Finance Program. The City of Candor, NC continues with several funding program contracts. […]]]>
  • Several subsidiaries in the finance, mobile applications and well-being sectors.

  • The Leon County, Florida Sheriff’s Department joins the Municipal Lease Program.

  • Cryptocurrency payment platform launched with a range of options.

  • The City of Yemassee, SC is renewing its business with the Municipal Finance Program.

  • The City of Candor, NC continues with several funding program contracts.

  • Southwest’s most exclusive private car club joins as an iMobileApp customer.

SRCO announces that ZAGMotoX, a leader in direct marketing of powersports OEM parts and equipment, has chosen Sparta’s iMobileApp to allow customers to easily find and purchase a wide selection of parts and accessories spare.

Eric Wade, Parts Manager for ZAGMotoX, said, “We knew we needed a mobile app for our customers, and after the knowledge and expertise we received from iMobileApp, I knew we had done The good choice. They were very professional and easy to deal with!

The app is available and can be viewed at https://imobileapp.com/mobile-app-gallery/zagmotox/.

Anthony Havens, CEO of Sparta, said, “ZAGMotoX approached iMobileApp when considering their options, and we were proud to have been chosen to provide a useful tool for their online business.

Sparta Commercial Services, Inc., (OTC: SRCO) founded in 2004, is a New York-based technology company with its roots in the powersports industry where it originally focused on financing consumers and municipalities for motorsports, recreation and automobiles. Industries. SRCO, through its subsidiaries, offers a wide range of one-stop online technology products and services, and offers a full range of cannabidiol wellness products through a website and mobile application for to consumers.

Sparta Commercial Services, Inc., (www.spartacommercial.com), is the parent company of three subsidiaries: iMobile Solutions, Inc., New World Health Brands, Inc. and Sparta Crypto, Inc., offering a variety of products and services .

Sparta Municipal Finance Division (www.spartamunicipal.com) offers and administers a specialized municipal finance program for local and state agencies whose jurisdictions are looking for a better way to finance their growing needs for essential equipment such as motorcycles and police cruisers, EMS equipment and buses, and any kind of equipment a municipality needs.

iMobile Solutions, Inc., through its iMobileApp product, develops and maintains custom mobile applications for a wide range of businesses, including restaurants, liquor stores, racetracks, and clubs; as well as car dealerships, including Harley-Davidson® and John Deere. Other mobile communication products offered include website design, development, hosting and SEO services, as well as text messaging and alert service.

Other product offerings from iMobile Solutions, Inc. include comprehensive vehicle title history reports for motorcycles, recreational vehicles, and heavy trucks. Reports have been purchased in all 50 states and 61 other countries, and viewed by potential customers in more than 125 countries.

New World Health Brands, Inc. offers a full line of wellness products such as supplements including zinc, magnesium, boron, iodine, beetroot extract, and more on its website. B to C (www.newworldhealthbrands.com) as well as hemp. CBD-derived products that include oils, topicals, capsules, tablets, and tinctures for pets.

Sparta Crypto, Inc. has launched its first product, SpartaPayIQTM, a payment gateway that allows businesses to accept cryptocurrencies, and has another product in development that will be officially announced at launch.

On March 9, SRCO announced that the Leon County, Florida Sheriff’s Department had selected Sparta’s municipal leasing program to fund a fleet of Harley-Davidson police motorcycles.

On March 3, SRCO announced the launch of SpartaPayIQ™, a payment gateway that allows businesses to accept cryptocurrencies. The SRCO platform allows businesses to accept Bitcoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, Litecoin, Dogecoin, and USDT as payment methods while settling in USD or EUR. Businesses also have the option of holding the cryptocurrency if they don’t want to convert it immediately.

SpartaPayIQ™ establishes the SRCO entry into the dynamic cryptocurrency space. SRCO plans to unveil another cryptocurrency product in the coming months and SpartaPayIQ™ will be an integral part of this new product. The platform will also be offered as a payment method on other SRCO retail sites, including New World Health Brands CBD and Cyclechex.

On March 2, SRCO announced that the city of Yemassee, SC has returned to its municipal finance program for the sixth time since 2016. The SRCO program helps local governments get the essential equipment they need, qu whether it’s cargo bay equipment or a complete vehicle fleet. in an affordable way.

For more information about Sparta Commercial Services, Inc. (SRCO), visit: www.spartacommercial.com

WARNING: This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell stocks.

Media Contact
Company Name: SPARTA COMMERCIAL SERVICES, INC
E-mail: Send an email
Call: (212)239-2666
Address:555 Fifth Avenue, 14th Floor
City: New York
State: NY 10017
Country: United States
Website: http://www.spartacommercial.com/

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